Friday, March 23, 2007

Washington Post on Edwards

The editorial, Choosing to Live, in the Washington Post, captures Eugene Robinson's reaction to the yesterday's announcement. It is an inspiring read, and well worth the fact that you will need to set up a (free) account in order to fully access the online content for the newspaper. Here's a sample, just to tempt you:

Having shared so many triumphs and defeats, having endured innumerable rubber-chicken fundraisers, having shaken hands and kissed babies and done all the endless things a candidate and his spouse are required to do, Elizabeth and John Edwards had to make a decision. They don't know how her health will progress over the next months and years. They could spend that time nesting with their family. Or they could spend it amid the exhilarating chaos of a presidential campaign, grabbing for the brass ring they've long had in sight.
Do they really have a choice?


Run, John and Elizabeth, run. Enjoy the campaign, every thrilling minute. Enjoy it together.
eugenerobinson@washpost.com

3 comments:

Don Thieme said...

I think that they made the right choice. It was disheartening to me to read all of the mean-spirited posts on some right-wing blogs about this on Thursday.

Kathy said...

Yeah, Don, it looks like once again the self-proclaimed guardians of Christianity have forgotten to ask themselves "What Would Jesus Do?"

Tina said...

As a cancer survivor, let me add that it's best to put your mind on something else, take your treatment, and keep moving forward. The alternative is to sit around and think about cancer and get really mopey. John and Elizabeth Edwards were right to decide not to "cower in a corner." If I didn't know whether I had ten months or ten years (or whatever) ahead of me, it would be much more appealing to spend that time participating in a big event in American history than
"cowering," to use John Edwards' term. Cancer is a disease. A presidential race is a high peak in the life of a candidate and those near to him. Why would they want to miss that? If/when the disease and its treatment begin to wear her down, she's a sensible woman and will act accordingly. Meanwhile.."Go for it!"